Thanasi Papoulias

Thanasi Papoulias is the Founder of "Excuse Me, Are You Greek?". His passion for Greece and everything Greek inspired him to start this blog and the popular social media accounts.

Thanasi Papoulias has 420 posts and counting. See all posts by Thanasi Papoulias

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7 thoughts on “Listen: The Sound of Hagia Sophia, 500+ Years Ago

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    July 13, 2020 at 5:37 am
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    Absolutely beautiful & stunning! Thank you Thank you! A blessing gift tio sing there!

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    July 17, 2020 at 8:35 pm
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    Capella Romana has made a whole album of this music. Whoops! That’s who it’s about. and it’s AH-yi-a so-FI-a. He keeps mispronouncing it.

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    July 17, 2020 at 8:37 pm
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    And you wouldn’t be sitting – you’d be standing. Pews were a Protestant invention. Even in the West, there were no pews or chairs. And instruments were banned by the Christian Church, East and West.. Not until the 1500’s did instruments start to be brought into the Western Church, against the canons of the Church

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    July 24, 2020 at 12:13 pm
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    It’s sacrilege to turn Ayia Sophia into a mosque. It was never built as a mosque. One day I hope it becomes Ayia Sophia and we can all go.

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      July 29, 2020 at 12:46 pm
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      This is sooo beautiful, I don’t have words for this bizantine music in the Hagia Sofia. Thank you for this!

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    July 26, 2020 at 5:51 am
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    On Friday Hagia Sophia closed as a museum and opened as a mosque – a new carpet covering the polished marble floors, the mosaics obscured, for the first time in 85 years the building closed to tourists for Friday prayers.

    Kevin Childs has written a piece for the Independent, part panegyric, part elegy for the great museum it once was.

    Here it is:

    https://www.independent.co.uk/independentpremium/long-reads/hagia-sophia-mosque-erdogan-turkey-istanbul-secularism-museum-a9624376.html

    It’s a Long Read.

    I’ve been to Hagia Sophia countless times. I loved it there. Part of the reason for that is that it was not a place of worship.

    It’s funny how much certain buildings can affect us. I feel rather mournful, just as the hardliners in Turkey are probably elated.

    You’ll be pleased to have read this.

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